According to a typical economic theory, prices are optimally determined in a fair and transparent market, and not by a political or academic body. In deregulation of electricity markets, one immediate concern with pricing is that incumbent electricity providers would undercut the prices of new entrants, preventing competition and perpetuating the existing monopoly of providers. Thus, the SB7 bill introduced a phase-in period during which a price floor would be established (for incumbent electricity companies) to prevent this predatory practice, allowing new market entrants to become established. New market entrants could charge a price below the price to beat, but incumbents could not. This period was to last from 2002 to January 1, 2007. As of 2007 Texas investor owned utility affiliates no longer have price to beat tariffs.[4]
The ability to make an electric power switch gives Texas energy consumers the freedom to shop and search for a new rate. Texans switch power providers for a number of reasons. You may choose to switch power supply providers because you move to a new utility area that your current retail provider doesn't service. Maybe you switch power providers because you're unhappy with your current provider's level of customer service. Maybe your reason for switching is simply to find a better rate than what you have now. Whatever your reason may be, you have the power to switch electricity providers.
Compared to the rest of the nation, data from the U.S. Energy Information Administration which publishes annual state electric prices [6] shows that Texas' electric prices did rise above the national average immediately after deregulation from 2003 to 2009, but, from 2010 to 2015 have moved significantly below the national average price per kWh, with a total cost of $0.0863 per kWh in Texas in 2015 vs. $0.1042 nationally, or 17 percent lower in Texas. Between 2002-2014 the total cost to Texas consumers is estimated to be $24B, an average of $5,100 per household, more than comparable markets under state regulation.[7] [8]
Since the Texas electricity market opened to competition in 2002, many Texas residents have had the opportunity to choose their own electricity provider. Instead of relying on their local utility to provide them with electricity, most Texans can choose from a variety of competitive providers, allowing them to shop around for the perfect electricity plan for their homes and lifestyles.
One of the newest and most exciting things we’ve introduced into the market is a strategic partnership with Amazon, allowing us to offer customers in Texas new fixed-rate electricity plans that include an Amazon Echo Dot. Our Power on Command and Weekends on Command plans  offer protection from seasonal price fluctuations, plus an Echo Dot to manage all your smart home needs. Our Alexa Skill adds even more convenience, giving you the power to access and manage your Direct Energy account using voice commands.
There are many different options for term lengths in the Texas energy market. Different term lengths often have different price points, so if you’re more flexible with the length of your contract, you could get a cheaper rate. Contracts with shorter term lengths are great if you prefer to avoid a long-term commitment while longer contracts usually provide the benefit of longer-term price stability.

Which ones the best? Like all things energy, it depends. Do you prefer predictability, or do you like the idea of potentially saving some cash by monitoring the market? Our (albeit conservative) recommendation: Fixed rate is probably best. Energy prices are on the rise — the U.S. Energy Information Administration predicts a 3 percent increase in residential electricity prices in 2018.
Utility companies are responsible for transmission and delivery of electricity even in energy deregulated parts of Texas and should be contacted in the event of a power outage. Your retail energy supplier may provide you competitive electric rates or exceptional customer service, but they cannot repair power lines or restore your service. In the case of an emergency, contact:
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